timthumb Small business issues have played a key role in the federal election campaign underway, with the leaders of the three main parties emphasizing the importance entrepreneurs have in advancing the Canadian economy. Small business owners concerned about access to capital, reducing red tape, controlling government spending and a lack of support for mid- to late-career entrepreneurs are anxiously awaiting the outcome of the federal election. “I think it’s really important that small businesses and entrepreneurs think about what and who they’re voting for, since government by and large creates the environment in which they operate,” said Victoria Lennox, CEO and co-founder of Startup Canada, a grassroots network of entrepreneurs. “As an entrepreneur, it’s important to ask, ‘Do (the candidates) understand what I’m going through?’” The Canadian Federation of Independent Business, which represents 109,000 small business owners nationwide, recently asked party leaders about their commitments to small businesses. The Conservative, NDP and Liberal parties all said they would continue to reduce taxes, while the latter also aims to invest nearly $60 billion in public infrastructure in the next 10 years. The Green Party promised to further diversify the small business landscape, with more women- and First Nations-led startups. “I think [the relationship between business and government] has been improving,” Lennox said. “They’re definitely listening and they’ve always kept the conversation open, but whether they understand startups is something else.” “Canada is one of the leading startup countries and the movement has come into its own,” said Lennox, who founded Startup Canada in 2012 to unite the community. “As long as government is talking to the startup community and working with entrepreneurs to create those frameworks, I think entrepreneurs need to look at their local candidates and be party agnostic to make sure they’ll listen to you if you share your experiences.” We know what the party leaders are offering but what would entrepreneurs like to see from their politicians? Startup Canada’s weekly podcast, which airs Tuesdays and is hosted by Rivers Corbett, co-founder of reLiSH Gourmet Burgers chain, gathered some thoughts from its guests about governments and small business — some food for thought as you get ready to head to the polls Oct. 19: John Ruffolo, CEO of OMERS Ventures “Let me give you an analogy — let’s use a farmer’s field. The role of government should be to help identify the actual field, to plough the field, to fertilize it and to remove some weeds out of the field. The weeds would be the equivalent of red tape, as an example. Then, allow the private sector to select the seeds that actually grow in those fields. Do not have the government, in essence, pick winners and losers. It’s difficult enough for the private sector to do that, and what it does is create distortions in the economy.” Frank O’Dea, co-founder of Second Cup “Many of us get stuck in the small business environment because we don’t know how to think differently. Thinking differently means experience, and being in experience with these large contracts could be very, very useful and very helpful. Partnerships and long-term relationships can grow out of those things, but it requires a policy shift at the federal and provincial levels to have a carve-out for small business.” Ryan Holmes, CEO of Hootsuite “There is an endless opportunity in technology, whereas the resource economy will ultimately head down more and more. We need to be telling this story. We need to be graduating more grads to be working in this industry. It’s a huge industry that pays people more than other and provides so many opportunities for them. So the education programs that are out there, that gets more and more people interested in looking at this industry, and I think we need to be telling educators to get the crop of people ready.” Chris Johnson, CEO of Permission Click “Follow the lead of the private sector, and in fact, the federal government. Here in Winnipeg, we have an enormous amount of support from those two entities, and the province has done an amazing job stepping up … on an ongoing basis, we have a multi-year commitment from them to support Startup Winnipeg’s operations, which is fantastic.” Noah Redler, campus director of Notman House in Montreal “[Startups are] very nimble and we’re able to do that because we’re small and we use our resources in a different way. Government doesn’t have that luxury — they have a lot of stakeholders, there are a lot of citizens they need to think about, not all of them have the same ideas, there are different political parties and different visions for how to move the country forward. But it’s an inseparable relationship. Business and government work together, whether it’s tax credits, whether it’s exports and whether it’s working to develop programs to support entrepreneurship.”   Source: FinancialPost

Category: Starion Blog

timthumb

Small business issues have played a key role in the federal election campaign underway, with the leaders of the three main parties emphasizing the importance entrepreneurs have in advancing the Canadian economy. Small business owners concerned about access to capital, reducing red tape, controlling government spending and a lack of support for mid- to late-career entrepreneurs are anxiously awaiting the outcome of the federal election.

Continue reading ..

HST

The topic of HST and HST rebate is one that has created much confusion over the years since its inception back in 2010. Since the introduction of HST by the Mcguinty government in July 2010, there’s been multiple perceptions, confusion and opinions about how it works, who gets it and who benefits from it. HST and how it affects pre-construction purchasers, specifically investors (i.e. up to 80% of the Condo market right now), is a terribly unclear issue. Continue reading ..

 

A new June 2015 report from the Financial Post reminds us that between taxes, inflation and fees, mediocre interest and returns often put Canadian investors in a net loss situation. That means their savings and retirement dollars are shrinking each year. As is the income earning potential of that capital for providing for retirement years. When deposit rates are back into 6 percent plus territory they may be worth considering again. Of course there will be other investment opportunities returning more then as well. The big question is where to find positive returns and safely.

Experienced international investors are plowing hundreds of billions into North American real estate this year. They consider it seriously undervalued. Here are 4 reasons sophisticated global investors are more than bullish on this Canadian asset in 2015

Continue reading ..

Photo_Asset_1

GREATER TORONTO, – The price gap between new high-rise and low-rise homes in the GTA hit a new record high in April, tripling over the past 10 years, the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) announced today.

The difference is now $326,659, with the average price of a new ground-related home in the GTA at $775,419  while the average price of a high-rise condo is $448,760, according to the RealNet New Home Price Index. This is a significant increase from April 2005 when the gap between a new low-rise home and a new high-rise home was $101,936.

Continue reading ..

 

This amazing story goes to show that its never too early or too late to start investing in real estate.

Most real estate investors encounter challenges and obstacles that they need to overcome in order to invest in a property. It’s easy to become frustrated at the challenges, and even let them hold you back from investing. But one young investor shows that it is entirely possible to push through any barrier – even at the age of 13 – to find, secure, and close a deal.

Meet Neaville Ram. He lives in Surrey,  BC with his father, mother, and younger brother. Shortly after becoming a REIN Member at the age of 12, he located a deal, negotiated with the seller, and signed the offer. Now 13 years old, he’s the proud owner of a triplex in Ontario. Oh yes, it’s in Ontario.

Continue reading ..

 

The opportunity to buy a brand-new condo for under $100,000 in Metro Vancouver’s sizzling real estate market brought hundreds of people to a Surrey sales centre on Saturday.

Prospective buyers stood in line for hours to buy into the 35-storey Evolve concrete tower. A big draw were the micro suites, starting at 316 sq. ft. and $93,900.

Continue reading ..

IQ Condos Phase 2

It is without a doubt that Toronto’s pre-construction market for condos has seen its fair share of increase over the past 10 years. Here are 10 things you need to know before falling in love with that unit as an investor or a buyer:

1. The Deposit Structure – While purchasers of resale condos in Toronto generally provide a deposit of 5% (or less) upon signing of the agreement, builders generally require significantly higher deposits in order to fund the construction – often as high as 15 or 20%. Continue reading ..