QuadReal Unveils MASSIVE Plans for Cloverdale Mall Redevelopment

Another suburban shopping mall, another transformative mixed-use master plan. Following a growing trend across Toronto, QuadReal is in the process of putting together a comprehensive redevelopment of Cloverdale Mall that could transform it into a mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented community complete with thousands of new residents, a neighbourhood park, and plenty of new, reimagined retail. Compared to some others, however, this master plan seems to be headed in the right direction: the preliminary scheme was presented to the Toronto Design Review Panel at their latest session, who called it a "masterful example of mall transformation". Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoProposed Cloverdale Mall master plan, image via submission to the City of Toronto.
Located on a very impressive site, Cloverdale Mall is bordered by The East Mall, Dundas Street West, and Highway 427, with the cloverleaf interchange of Dundas and the 427 at its southwest corner. The redevelopment plans would replace the existing mall and surface parking lots with a complete community, looking to urbanize the under-utilized site with a new street grid and a pedestrianized public realm. The master plan is being drafted by a team including Giannone Petricone Associates as architects, Urban Strategies as planners, and Janet Rosenberg & Studio as landscape architects, among others. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoView of the existing Cloverdale Mall, image via submission to the City of Toronto. Before we delve into the details of the development and Panel commentary, it should be noted that the plan is still in the pre-application phase, and therefore all conceptual renderings and images showing massing and materials are indicative and may be adjusted as the plan evolves. There are four main aspects that comprise the design team's vision for the site. The vision focuses on enhancing the public realm and community amenities, providing plenty of green space and a new community amenity while emphasizing pedestrians; embracing mixed-use, which includes a mix of housing typologies as well as a variety of residential, commercial, and community programs; and pursuing excellence in sustainable community design. They have also established the goal of redefining the retail from a regional shopping mall experience to a more neighbourhood retail experience, incorporating locally-focused food and beverage, convenience, lifestyle, and micro-retail, while also including major anchor tenants. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoDiagram illustrating programmatic areas of the master plan, image via submission to the City of Toronto. An organic street grid is overlaid on the property, centred around a retail main street that forms a crescent through the middle of the site, connecting at both ends to The East Mall. Smaller streets feed off of this, dividing the property into development blocks, with another major street proposed to the south to connect with Dundas. The streets within the block will be designed with pedestrians in mind, with landscaped streetscapes and plenty of active uses at ground level. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoDiagram illustrating proposed street network, image via submission to the City of Toronto. The existing edges of the property are essentially defined by high-speed traffic barriers, with a low-rise suburban neighbourhood located to the east. The new south street providing access to Dundas is planned to have a lighted intersection to take pressure off The East Mall as the primary access road while calming traffic along the highway-like Dundas just before it reaches the interchange. The design team hopes this will create a more urban frontage along Dundas, particularly with the addition of a new community amenity at the southeast corner of the site. The underpass where The East Mall tunnels below Dundas and continues south will be maintained. The community amenity is located at the corner of Dundas and The East Mall Crescent, and looks to anchor the site with a prominent building at this major intersection. The program for the community amenity is not yet defined, but the proponent team is considering an arts and culture centre geared toward the local community. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoConceptual rendering of Dundas Street, image via submission to the City of Toronto. Filtering through the site is a network of green spaces anchored by a large neighbourhood park to the east. The park takes up several acres of the site area, and will contain both passive and actively programmed spaces. It is also proposed to contain a new food market building at its south end, with a landscaped sloping green roof that merges the building with the park. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoRendering of the park and retail block, image via submission to the City of Toronto. The neighbourhood is also proposed to be encircled by linear green spaces, with a new green promenade along The East Mall, and a new 'Edge Trail' along the south and west borders of the site within the required highway setback of 14 metres. Further green spaces are provided for with courtyards and roof terraces in the built form. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoDiagram illustrating the green space throughout the master plan, image via submission to the City of Toronto. The built form being proposed is significant, but not out of character for the density boom happening along the 427 corridor. A total of 10 towers are proposed, ranging in height from 16 to 48 storeys. The towers are arranged along the south and west edges of the site, closest to the highway, and will sit on 4-to-6-storey mid-rise podiums. Generous separation distances are given between the towers that far exceed the City's 25-metre minimum. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoAerial rendering of Cloverdale Mall redevelopment, image via submission to the City of Toronto. In the central block, the design team imagines a 'Village on the Park' complex, with a one-storey retail building framed with two 8-storey mid-rises along the south and west edges. The central block is porous with open-air pedestrian walkways lined with retail that lead to a central covered gathering and event space dubbed 'Cloverdale Square'. The retail complex spans between the retail main street and the public park. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoDiagram of the central retail block, image via submission to the City of Toronto. The Panel was impressed with the level of detail and amount of work presented, congratulating the design team on their progress thus far. They were quite happy with the layout, saying that there was "a ton of things to admire about this project" and that it was a "terrific example" of how to transform a post-war mall site. Panelists were encouraged by the street network, mix of uses, small-scale retail focus, and integration of green spaces. They did, however, point out several areas that the proponents could focus on to improve upon the master plan. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoConceptual rendering of Cloverdale Square, image via submission to the City of Toronto. A suggestion raised by the Panel was to think outside the podium-and-tower form in terms of the building typologies and massing. They all agreed that the amount of density proposed was reasonable, but that "the issue is how you deliver [that density] in what built form and what location". They encouraged the design team to explore "innovative mid-rise forms" to avoid the typical "tower clutter" lined up along the edges, and to be more strategic in the massing and placement of the buildings in order to "provide a diversity of character". Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoSite plan showing building heights, image via submission to the City of Toronto. Panel members praised the amount of green space proposed, and applauded the design team on the fact that the new park would be shadow-free for most of the year. They liked the idea of the Edge Trail, though some Panelists cautioned that the design of it would be tricky given the highway conditions. As well, they appreciated the effort to pedestrianize the streetscapes, though they cautioned that some of the roads seemed a bit too wide. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoConceptual rendering of the Edge Trail, image via submission to the City of Toronto. A common issue that came up which could have a major impact on various aspects of the project was phasing. While the vision of the final product proposed was clear, Panel members questioned what would happen in the interim as the master plan gets built out, and whether this may impact the success of the retail, public realm, community amenities, or sustainability goals. No phasing strategy has yet been developed by the proponents. The design team was also urged to push the sustainability aspects of the project even further, with suggestions to consider a district energy plan to help mitigate the carbon footprint, and to think about potential future sustainability standards like Toronto Green Standard Tiers 3 and 4. The issue of the lack of transit was also raised, as one Panelist cautioned that it could risk becoming another "auto-oriented vertical suburb". The design team did point out that they have proposed a bus stop at the new lighted intersection along Dundas, and are designing the new street grid to allow for a future bus loop through the site if the TTC wishes to implement one. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoProposed ground floor plan and uses, image via submission to the City of Toronto. The Panel also reiterated their common critique of building communities adjacent to major highways, asking how noise and air quality are being mitigated. The design team acknowledged that these issues are being taken into consideration but are not yet resolved, and the Panel urged them to further explore solutions through the built form, layout, and public realm design. In the end, the Panel was very encouraged by what they saw and were pleased with the direction the master plan was headed in. They encouraged the design team to push their ideas further, saying that this site has a huge potential to become an exemplar for the many mall transformations to come. There was no vote held at the end given that this was a pre-application presentation. Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoConceptual rendering of the retail main street, image via submission to the City of Toronto. Once the initial framework of the Cloverdale Mall master plan is finalized, the project will be submitted for rezoning, likely sometime in early 2020, at which point we will know more about the statistics and details of the development. In the meantime, QuadReal has been carrying out extensive community consultations and is taking feedback on the design. You can get involved in the process by visiting their on-site engagement and arts and culture space, Cloverdale Common, or by visiting the project website here.   Source: https://urbantoronto.ca

Category: Starion Blog

QuadReal Unveils MASSIVE Plans for Cloverdale Mall Redevelopment

Another suburban shopping mall, another transformative mixed-use master plan. Following a growing trend across Toronto, QuadReal is in the process of putting together a comprehensive redevelopment of Cloverdale Mall that could transform it into a mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented community complete with thousands of new residents, a neighbourhood park, and plenty of new, reimagined retail. Compared to some others, however, this master plan seems to be headed in the right direction: the preliminary scheme was presented to the Toronto Design Review Panel at their latest session, who called it a “masterful example of mall transformation”.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoProposed Cloverdale Mall master plan, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

Located on a very impressive site, Cloverdale Mall is bordered by The East Mall, Dundas Street West, and Highway 427, with the cloverleaf interchange of Dundas and the 427 at its southwest corner. The redevelopment plans would replace the existing mall and surface parking lots with a complete community, looking to urbanize the under-utilized site with a new street grid and a pedestrianized public realm. The master plan is being drafted by a team including Giannone Petricone Associates as architects, Urban Strategies as planners, and Janet Rosenberg & Studio as landscape architects, among others.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoView of the existing Cloverdale Mall, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

Before we delve into the details of the development and Panel commentary, it should be noted that the plan is still in the pre-application phase, and therefore all conceptual renderings and images showing massing and materials are indicative and may be adjusted as the plan evolves.

There are four main aspects that comprise the design team’s vision for the site. The vision focuses on enhancing the public realm and community amenities, providing plenty of green space and a new community amenity while emphasizing pedestrians; embracing mixed-use, which includes a mix of housing typologies as well as a variety of residential, commercial, and community programs; and pursuing excellence in sustainable community design. They have also established the goal of redefining the retail from a regional shopping mall experience to a more neighbourhood retail experience, incorporating locally-focused food and beverage, convenience, lifestyle, and micro-retail, while also including major anchor tenants.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoDiagram illustrating programmatic areas of the master plan, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

An organic street grid is overlaid on the property, centred around a retail main street that forms a crescent through the middle of the site, connecting at both ends to The East Mall. Smaller streets feed off of this, dividing the property into development blocks, with another major street proposed to the south to connect with Dundas. The streets within the block will be designed with pedestrians in mind, with landscaped streetscapes and plenty of active uses at ground level.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoDiagram illustrating proposed street network, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

The existing edges of the property are essentially defined by high-speed traffic barriers, with a low-rise suburban neighbourhood located to the east. The new south street providing access to Dundas is planned to have a lighted intersection to take pressure off The East Mall as the primary access road while calming traffic along the highway-like Dundas just before it reaches the interchange. The design team hopes this will create a more urban frontage along Dundas, particularly with the addition of a new community amenity at the southeast corner of the site. The underpass where The East Mall tunnels below Dundas and continues south will be maintained.

The community amenity is located at the corner of Dundas and The East Mall Crescent, and looks to anchor the site with a prominent building at this major intersection. The program for the community amenity is not yet defined, but the proponent team is considering an arts and culture centre geared toward the local community.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoConceptual rendering of Dundas Street, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

Filtering through the site is a network of green spaces anchored by a large neighbourhood park to the east. The park takes up several acres of the site area, and will contain both passive and actively programmed spaces. It is also proposed to contain a new food market building at its south end, with a landscaped sloping green roof that merges the building with the park.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoRendering of the park and retail block, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

The neighbourhood is also proposed to be encircled by linear green spaces, with a new green promenade along The East Mall, and a new ‘Edge Trail’ along the south and west borders of the site within the required highway setback of 14 metres. Further green spaces are provided for with courtyards and roof terraces in the built form.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoDiagram illustrating the green space throughout the master plan, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

The built form being proposed is significant, but not out of character for the density boom happening along the 427 corridor. A total of 10 towers are proposed, ranging in height from 16 to 48 storeys. The towers are arranged along the south and west edges of the site, closest to the highway, and will sit on 4-to-6-storey mid-rise podiums. Generous separation distances are given between the towers that far exceed the City’s 25-metre minimum.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoAerial rendering of Cloverdale Mall redevelopment, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

In the central block, the design team imagines a ‘Village on the Park’ complex, with a one-storey retail building framed with two 8-storey mid-rises along the south and west edges. The central block is porous with open-air pedestrian walkways lined with retail that lead to a central covered gathering and event space dubbed ‘Cloverdale Square’. The retail complex spans between the retail main street and the public park.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoDiagram of the central retail block, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

The Panel was impressed with the level of detail and amount of work presented, congratulating the design team on their progress thus far. They were quite happy with the layout, saying that there was “a ton of things to admire about this project” and that it was a “terrific example” of how to transform a post-war mall site. Panelists were encouraged by the street network, mix of uses, small-scale retail focus, and integration of green spaces. They did, however, point out several areas that the proponents could focus on to improve upon the master plan.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoConceptual rendering of Cloverdale Square, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

A suggestion raised by the Panel was to think outside the podium-and-tower form in terms of the building typologies and massing. They all agreed that the amount of density proposed was reasonable, but that “the issue is how you deliver [that density] in what built form and what location”. They encouraged the design team to explore “innovative mid-rise forms” to avoid the typical “tower clutter” lined up along the edges, and to be more strategic in the massing and placement of the buildings in order to “provide a diversity of character”.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoSite plan showing building heights, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

Panel members praised the amount of green space proposed, and applauded the design team on the fact that the new park would be shadow-free for most of the year. They liked the idea of the Edge Trail, though some Panelists cautioned that the design of it would be tricky given the highway conditions. As well, they appreciated the effort to pedestrianize the streetscapes, though they cautioned that some of the roads seemed a bit too wide.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoConceptual rendering of the Edge Trail, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

A common issue that came up which could have a major impact on various aspects of the project was phasing. While the vision of the final product proposed was clear, Panel members questioned what would happen in the interim as the master plan gets built out, and whether this may impact the success of the retail, public realm, community amenities, or sustainability goals. No phasing strategy has yet been developed by the proponents.

The design team was also urged to push the sustainability aspects of the project even further, with suggestions to consider a district energy plan to help mitigate the carbon footprint, and to think about potential future sustainability standards like Toronto Green Standard Tiers 3 and 4. The issue of the lack of transit was also raised, as one Panelist cautioned that it could risk becoming another “auto-oriented vertical suburb”. The design team did point out that they have proposed a bus stop at the new lighted intersection along Dundas, and are designing the new street grid to allow for a future bus loop through the site if the TTC wishes to implement one.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoProposed ground floor plan and uses, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

The Panel also reiterated their common critique of building communities adjacent to major highways, asking how noise and air quality are being mitigated. The design team acknowledged that these issues are being taken into consideration but are not yet resolved, and the Panel urged them to further explore solutions through the built form, layout, and public realm design.

In the end, the Panel was very encouraged by what they saw and were pleased with the direction the master plan was headed in. They encouraged the design team to push their ideas further, saying that this site has a huge potential to become an exemplar for the many mall transformations to come. There was no vote held at the end given that this was a pre-application presentation.

Cloverdale Mall, QuadReal, Giannone Petricone Associates, TorontoConceptual rendering of the retail main street, image via submission to the City of Toronto.

Once the initial framework of the Cloverdale Mall master plan is finalized, the project will be submitted for rezoning, likely sometime in early 2020, at which point we will know more about the statistics and details of the development. In the meantime, QuadReal has been carrying out extensive community consultations and is taking feedback on the design. You can get involved in the process by visiting their on-site engagement and arts and culture space, Cloverdale Common, or by visiting the project website here.

 

Source: https://urbantoronto.ca

Etobicoke Rising: First Capital Submits Urban Vision for 28 Acre Christie’s Plant Site

 

If there was any question whether First Capital Realty were serious about building something substantial and out-of-the-ordinary when they bought the 11 ha/28 acre former Christie’s Cookies plant site at Park Lawn and Lake Shore in the Toronto borough of Etobicoke, any doubts would have been erased for observers of the world’s city-building scene when the company hired Allies and Morrison of London to lead the master planning with Toronto’s renowned Urban Strategies Inc.. Architects and Urban Planners, Allies and Morrison are best known internationally for their major transformation of the area around King’s Cross station in London, a derelict 24 ha/60 acre site where regeneration started in 2007, has since been embraced by Londoners, and continues to grow today. Now, First Capital have submitted their concept proposal to the City of Toronto for the Christie’s site, fashioned to create a mixed-use neighbourhood that could rank as a major destination within the GTA.

Looking east across the Christie's site, Toronto, image courtesy First CapitalLooking east across the Christie’s site and Humber Bay towards Downtown Toronto, image courtesy First Capital

First Capital bought the site in 2016 (with a more recent purchase of the former Bank of Montreal location at 2194 Lake Shore) and has brought in the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board as a 50% partner. Beyond Allies and Morrison and Urban Strategies Inc., their design team includes Adamson Associates Architects as Architect of Record, ERA Architects covering heritage aspects, landscape architecture by DTAH of Toronto and Gross Max of Edinburgh, engineering by Arup, transportation planners Hatch and BA Group, and more. Over the last three years, the proponents held two well-subscribed public meetings asking attendees for their input on what they’d like to see on the site, and much of what is proposed in the ground realm at least is based on some of the wish list.

Looking south across the Christie's site, Toronto, image courtesy First CapitalLooking south across the Christie’s site and Humber Bay Shores to Lake Ontario, image courtesy First Capital

The scale of what has been proposed will take many off guard, with 15 towers proposed higher than 20 storeys tall, the tallest topping out at 71 storeys, or similar in height to the taller of the two Eau du Soleil towers now being completed nearby. Conversely the depth of the neighbourhood amenities and services, and the degree of animation of the neighbourhood, will appeal to many living in the area now who are looking for a more complete, more cohesive area of the city to live in.

The height in storeys of the tallest buildings proposed at 2150 Lake Shore BlvdThe height in storeys of the tallest buildings proposed at 2150 Lake Shore, image via submission to the City of Toronto

Across the Christie’s site, the plan calls for 41,900 m² of commercial office space, approximately 42,700 m² of retail, entertainment, restaurants, and community-oriented shops, and a 20,200 m² hotel with affiliated commercial space. A total of 7,446 residential units are proposed. 

Looking into the heart of the Christie's site, image courtesy of First CapitalLooking down into the heart of the site, image courtesy of First Capital Realty 

Three public squares, a park, a central sheltered galleria lined with shops and restaurants, several pocket-sized places to gather, and pedestrian mews are proposed to be strung throughout the site. Bicycle lanes would be introduced, while new roads would handle increased car traffic to the area, including one “Relief” road extending from Park Lawn and the Gardiner eastbound off ramp around most of the site to Lake Shore Boulevard, taking some volume of traffic off the Park Lawn and Lake Shore intersection. On-street traffic through the site would be unnecessary for most residents, and parking garage entrances are planned for the periphery of the site from Park Lawn Road and the “Relief” road, with the garages connected below ground. The proponents also suggest rebuilding of the Gardiner access ramps to and from the east of the site to feed into the new “Relief” road, while Lake Shore would get four new traffic lights along it, slowing it to an urban speed in an area that cars tend to speed through now.

The open space plan for the site includes a park and squares connected by walkwaThe open space plan for the site includes a park and squares connected by walkways, image via submission to the City of Toronto

A streetcar loop is proposed through the site, bringing vehicles up from Lake Shore Boulevard past the various squares to a new Park Lawn GO train station, before looping back to Lake Shore. Likely, 501 streetcars which currently turn around at the Humber Loop (approximately every second streetcar) would now turn around within the Christie’s site. Bus lay-bys are also proposed for the GO station which would also allow easy connections with the 66B Prince Edward bus. 

A streetcar travels the loop through the site beside plowed, dedicated bike laneA streetcar travels the loop through the site beside plowed, dedicated bike lanes, image courtesy of First Capital

The largest of three squares proposed within the site is Station Square, which leads pedestrians and streetcars to the intermodal transit hub from the south. The second largest square, dubbed Boulevard Square, fronts Lake Shore Blvd across from existing Humber Bay Shores towers, while another dubbed Entertainment Square, is planned closer to the east end of the site.

Concept plan for Entertainment Square at 2150 Lake Shore, image courtesy of FirsConcept plan for Entertainment Square at 2150 Lake Shore, image courtesy of First Capital

Retail is proposed to animate the ground level of a significant portion of the site overall, but the largest concentration is planned for the centre of the community, where a terraced Galleria shopping, eating, and strolling area would be sheltered between various towers and podiums. 

Looking down into part of the Galleria from a surrounding terrace, image courtesLooking east, down into part of the Galleria from a surrounding terrace, image courtesy of First Capital

The park would feature the water tower that now stands on the site, relocated so that it could be viewed at the end of various vistas into the site.

Looking west through Lake Shore Park, image courtesy of First CapitalLooking west through Lake Shore Park, image courtesy of First Capital

While the renderings are detailed, what is depicted in them remains conceptual at this point, indicative of the vision that First Capital has for the site, and not representing finished architectural designs for particular buildings. Jordan Robins, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at First Capital Realty, had this to say about the proposal upon its release:

“The vision for this Master-Planned development is to create an amenity rich, sustainable mixed use neighbourhood in Toronto that is seamlessly connected to the rest of the City. This neighbourhood will feature new and varied housing alternatives, significant employment space and complimentary retail space. Our commitment to infrastructure, design and placemaking shall serve to enrich this proposed development and the surrounding Humber Bay Shores community by providing both with vital, integrated transit options, improved commuter routes, and large active public spaces.”

Adam Paul, President and CEO of the Company, also issued a statement, saying:

“The conversion of the Development Site to allow for a mixed-use, transit-oriented development represents a critical milestone for our vision of revitalizing this significant Property. Our vision is to create a dynamic and vibrant master-planned neighbourhood with a high quality, sustainable urban design that fits exceptionally well with First Capital’s super urban strategy.” 

There are still several steps that the proposal must travel through before we see Site Plan Approval applications for any buildings: the first are likely a few years off still. The site having been zoned exclusively as employment land previously—there were 500 jobs at the Mr. Chrsitie’s Cookie factory when it closed in 2013—First Capital has been in discussion with the City since its purchase regarding bringing more uses to the site. A result was that in early summer 2019, City Council and the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (LPAT) approved the conversion of 9.9 ha/24.5 acres of the Development Site into a Regeneration Area with the remaining 1.4 ha/3.5 acres, closest to the proposed GO station, retained as Employment Lands. Totally density across the site is proposed at 7 million ft², 1 million ft² of retail, office and service-based uses, and 6 million ft² of residential. Parks and open community gathering areas represent over 25% of the site, while separation distances between towers typically far exceed the City’s 25 metre minimum, as seen below. 

Separation distances between the proposed towers, image via submission to the CiSeparation distances between the proposed towers, image via submission to the City of Toronto

At the same time that this application is proceeding, the City of Toronto is working on a Secondary Plan for the area, for which there was a public consultation held on October 17th, while a Park Lawn Lake Shore Transportation Master Plan Study also continues at the City. Further public consultations will inform the final versions of those plans, while this plan will no doubt factor into them as well.

Road infrastructure proposed for 2150 Lake Shore, image via submission to the CiRoad infrastructure proposed for 2150 Lake Shore, image via submission to the City of Toronto

The planning rationale for the 2150 Lake Shore development, available as part of a suite of documents submitted to the City to advance an Official Plan Amendment application, goes into far more detail than we can cover in this article.

A third public consultation on the site is expected soon, likely during November. UrbanToronto will follow up with more information as it becomes available. For now, additional information about the proposal and more images can be found in our Database file for the project, linked below. Want to get involved in the discussion? Check out the associated Forum thread, or leave a comment below.

 

Source: Urban Toronto | CNW

POSITIVE ONTARIO HOUSING SUPPLY ACTION PLAN SEEKS TO INCREASE HOUSING SUPPLY AND AFFORDABILITY

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On May 2, 2019, the Ontario government announced proposed changes to address barriers getting in the way of new ownership and rental housing throughout the province. Recommendations of industry experts, including the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) and the Ontario Home Builders’ Association (OHBA), influenced the government’s new policy. The recommendations are centered on themes of speed, cost, mix, rent, and innovation.

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The government on Monday released details of a program announced during the last federal budget, an initiative that could see Canada’s housing agency contribute up to 10 per cent of the price of a buyer’s first home if certain conditions are met.

Under the fine print for the First Time Home Buyer Incentive program, which was announced in March and will officially launch in September, a first-time homebuyer who earns less than $120,000 can qualify. The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation would kick it up to 10 per cent of the purchase price of the home, providing the borrower comes up with the minimum amount for an insured mortgage, which is now at five per cent.

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This Is How Much Rent Cost Across Canada In 2019

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If you were hoping the cost of rent dropped in Toronto this month, we’re sorry to say it hasn’t. The good news is, it also hasn’t risen.

According to Padmapper, the ranking for Canada’s top five priciest markets remained unchanged despite some minor drops in month-over-month prices.

The priciest Canadain city for rent continues to be Toronto with the average one bedroom unit costing approximately $2,270. Two bedrooms in Toronto average $2,850.

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Despite affordability concerns, Millennials are surprisingly optimistic about the GTA housing market

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It’s no secret that housing affordability remains a top concern for Millennials living in the GTA, as home prices continue to sit well above their 10-year average. But according to a new poll, the generation is surprisingly optimistic about the future of the market.

Up to 41 per cent of Millennials said they believe that the GTA is well prepared to provide housing for the number of new residents that settle there every year, according to Ipsos poll data released today by the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) and the Toronto Real Estate Board (TREB).

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A permanent generation of middle-class renters?

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This week’s housing newsletter was written by HuffPost Canada senior business editor Daniel Tencer.
To no one’s surprise, Canada’s mortgage industry really, really doesn’t like federal regulators’ new mortgage stress tests. Its principal industry association, Mortgage Professionals Canada, released a report a few weeks ago on the impact of the tests that is almost apocalyptic in tone. It blames the stress tests for this year’s housing market slowdown, estimating that the reduced real estate activity will mean Canada will create 200,000 fewer jobs over the next three years than it otherwise would have. Continue reading ..

Canada’s sudden population ‘boomlet’ boosts housing

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This week’s housing newsletter was written by HuffPost Canada senior business editor Daniel Tencer, who’s a little worried about what strong population growth means for Canada’s clogged freeways. Many Canadian homebuyers are sitting on the sidelines these days, wondering if the slowdown in home sales this year is a sign of lower prices ahead.
Don’t bet on it, is the message coming from Bank of Montreal economists. Canada’s population growth has accelerated, and that means upward pressure on the housing market, and potentially higher-than-expected interest rates as well. In an analysis issued Thursday, economists Doug Porter and Robert Kavcic noted that Canada’s population passed the 37 million mark in the second quarter of this year, having grown by about 506,000 over the past year. It’s the fastest percentage growth Canada has seen since 1991, making it the fastest-growing country in the G7.

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CMHC makes favourable announcement regarding self-employed borrowers

CMHC is giving lenders more guidance and flexibility on determining whether a self-employed person qualifies for a mortgage

 

Unknown-1OTTAWA — Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. is making changes intended to make it easier for the self-employed to qualify for a mortgage.

The national housing agency says it’s giving lenders more guidance and flexibility to help self-employed borrowers.

Self-employed Canadians may have a harder time qualifying for a mortgage as their incomes may vary or be less predictable.
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Pickering to open Huge Casino, Retail District, Hotel and Waterpark called DurhamLive

More than 10,000 jobs are expected to be created in Pickering after the Durham Live site was chosen for a casino and waterpark to open in 2019.DL1

Great Canadian Gaming, the company selected to operate casinos in the Greater Toronto Area, made the announcement.

That means Casino Ajax, the facility that’s been operating since 2006, will close.

Ontario Gaming GTA LP, a partnership between Great Canadian Gaming and Brookfield Business Partners, will operate the Pickering casino, which will be built at Church and Bayly streets.

The Durham Live proposal includes hotels, convention space, an indoor water park and film studios, along with the casino. Ontario Gaming GTA LP says the site would create more than 10,000 jobs.

The casino itself would have about 2,000 employees, including 1,700 new jobs. Continue reading ..